Wikis, Blogs, Delicious, RSS, Moodles. . . . OH MY! What does it all mean? Below are some websites and more Lee LeFever videos from Teacher Tube to help explain these items in plain English. We explained wikis on our main page since this site is a wiki.

Moodle is a course management system (CMS) - a free, Open Source software package designed using sound pedagogical principles, to help educators create effective online learning communities. Further information about moodles can be found at moodle.org. The CFF coaches use a moodle to communicate ideas, information, and concerns.

Blogs (most are blocked in school) are described below in this Lee LeFever video from Teacher Tube:



Search for blogs at Blogsearch.google.com or Technorati.com. Start a free blog at Blogger.com or Wordpress.com. Some of the most popular social networking sites used by students include blogging, MySpace and Facebook. The importance in all blogging is safety. An important site for Internet safety is isafe.org. This site is free and endorsed by endorsed by the U.S. Congress. i-SAFE is a non-profit foundation dedicated to protecting the online experiences of youth everywhere. i-SAFE incorporates classroom curriculum with dynamic community outreach to empower students, teachers, parents, law enforcement, and concerned adults to make the Internet a safer place.

Social bookmarking is a method for Internet users to store, organize, search, and manage bookmarks of web pages on the Internet with the help of metadata. In a social bookmarking system, users save links to web pages that they want to remember and/or share. Del.icio.us is a popular social bookmarking site. Social bookmarking is described below in another Lee LeFever video from Teacher Tube.



Some other social bookmarking sites are: digg.com, StumbleUpon.com, furl.net, reddit.com, kaboodle.com, MyBlogLog.com, Fark.com, Propeller.com and Technorati.com.

RSS (Really Simple Syndication) is a family of Web feed formats used to publish frequently updated content such as blog entries, news headlines or podcasts. An RSS document, which is called a "feed," "web feed," or "channel," contains either a summary of content from an associated web site or the full text. RSS makes it possible for people to keep up with their favorite web sites in an automated manner that's easier than checking them manually. RSS is described below in the final Lee LeFever video from Teacher Tube on this page.



Look for the RSS Symbol rss_icon_01.gifor rss.gif on your favorite blogs and sites in order to receive update notification in your E-mail.